Sunday, January 21, 2018

4cm thick wood cnc project: shelf

The lighter wood is about 4cm thick. Both of the sides are cut from a single plank of timber which left the feet with a slight weak point at the back. Given a larger bit of timber I would have tapered the legs outward from the back more gradually. But the design is restricted by the timber at hand.


The shelves are plywood which turned out fairly well after a few coats of poly. I knocked the extreme sharp edges of the ply so its a hurt a little rather than a lot if you accidentally poke the edge. This is a mixed machine and human build, the back of the plywood that meets the uprights was knocked off using a bandsaw.

Being able to CNC thick timber like this opens up more bold designs. Currently I have to use a 1/2 inch bit to get this reach. Stay tuned for more CNC timber fun!


Friday, January 5, 2018

That gantry just pops right off

Hobby CNC machines sold as "3040" may have a gantry clearance of about 80mm and a z axis travel of around 55mm. A detached gantry is shown below. Notice that there are 3 bolts on the bottom side mounting the z-axis to the gantry. The stepper motor attaches on the side shown so there are 4 NEMA holes to hold the stepper. Note that the normal 3040 doesn't have the mounting plate shown on the z-axis, that crossover plate allows a different spindle to be mounted to this machine.


The plan is to create replacement sides with some 0.5inch offcut 6061 alloy. This will add 100mm to the gantry so it can more easily clear clamps and a 4th axis. Because that would move the cutter mount upward as well, replacing the z-axis with something that has more range, say 160mm becomes an interesting plan.

One advantage to upgrading a machine like this is that you can reassemble the machine after measuring and designing the upgrade and then cut replacement parts for the machine using the machine.

The 3040 can look a bit spartan with the gantry removed.


The preliminary research is done. Designs created. CAM done. I just have to cut 4 plates and then the real fun begins.


Tuesday, October 3, 2017

Ikea wireless charger in CNC mahogany case

I notice that Ikea sell their wireless chargers without a shell for insertion into desks. The "desk" I chose is a curve cut profile in mahogany that just happens to have the same fit as an LG G3/4/5 type phone. The design changed along the way to a more upright one which then required a catch to stop the phone sliding off.


This was done in Fusion360 which allows bringing in STL files of things like phones and cutting those out of another body. It took a while to work out the ball end toolpath but I finally worked out how to get something that worked reasonably well. The chomps in the side allow fingers to securely lift the phone off the charger.

It will be interesting to play with sliced objects in wood. Layering 3D cuts to build up objects that are 10cm (or about 4 layers) tall.

Sunday, August 20, 2017

CNC Z Axis with 150mm or more of travel

Many of the hobby priced CNC machines have limited Z Axis movement. This coupled with limited clearance on the gantry force a limited number of options for work fixtures. For example, it is very unlikely that there will be clearance for a vice on the cutting bed of a cheap machine.

I started tinkering around with a Z Axis assembly which offers around 150mm of travel. The assembly also uses bearing blocks that should help overcome the tensions that drilling and cutting can offer.


The assembly is designed to be as thin as possible. The spindle mount is a little wider which allows easy bolting onto the spindle mount plate which attaches to these bearings and drive nut. The width of the assembly is important because it will limit the travel in the Y axis if it can interact with the gantry in any way.

Construction is mainly done in 1/4 and 1/2 inch 6061 alloy. The black bracket at the bottom is steel. This seemed like a reasonable choice since that bracket was going to be key to holding the weight and attachment to the gantry.

The Z axis shown above needs to be combined with a gantry height extension when attaching to a hobby CNC to be really effective. Using a longer travel Z axis like this would allow higher gantries which combined allow for easier fixturing and also pave the way for a 4/5th axis to fit under the cutter.

Thursday, August 10, 2017

Larger format CNC

Having access to a wood cutting CNC machine that can do a full sheet of plywood at once has led me to an initial project for a large sconce stand. The sconce is 210mm square at the base and the DAR ash I used was 140mm across. This lead to the four edge grain glue ups in the middle of the stand.


The design was created in Fusion 360 by just seeing what might look good. Unfortunately the sketch export as DXF presented some issues on the import side. This was part of why a littler project like this was a good first choice rather than a more complex whole sheet of ply.

To get around the DXF issue the tip was to select a face of a body and create a sketch from that face. Then export the created sketch as DXF which seemed to work much better. I don't know what I had in the original sketch that I created the body from that the DXF export/import didn't like. Maybe the dimensions, maybe the guide lines, hard to know without a bisect. The CNC was using the EnRoute software, so I had to work out how to bounce things from Fusion over to EnRoute and then get some help to reCAM things on that side and setup tabs et al.

One tip for others would be to use the DAR timber to form a glue up before arriving at a facility with a larger cut surface. Fewer pieces means less tabs/bridges and easier reCAM. A preformed blue panel would also have let me used more advanced designs such as n and u slots to connect two pieces instead of edge grains to connect four.

Overall it was a fun build and the owner of the sconce will love having it slightly off the table top so it can more easily be seen.

Sunday, June 4, 2017

Six is the magic number

I have talked about controlling robot arms with 4 or 5 motors and the maths involved in turning a desired x,y,z target into servo angles. Things get a little too interesting with 6 motors as you end up with a great deal of solutions to a positioning problem and need to work out a 'best' choice.


So I finally got MoveIt! to work to control a six motor arm using ROS. I now also know that using MoveIt on lower order arms isn't going to give you much love. Six is the magic number (plus claw motor) to get things working and patience is your best friend in getting the configuration and software setup going.

This was great as MoveIt was the last corner of the ROS stack that I hadn't managed to get to work for me. The great part is that the knowledge I gained playing with MoveIt will work on larger more accurate and expensive robot arms.

Wednesday, April 19, 2017

CNC Alloy Candelabra

While learning Fusion 360 I thought it would be fun to flex my new knowledge of cutting out curved shapes from alloy. Some donated LED fake candles were all the inspiration needed to design and cut out a candelabra. Yes, it is industrial looking. With vcarve and ball ends I could try to make it more baroque looking, but then that would require more artistic ability than a poor old progammer might have.


It is interesting working out how to fixture the cut for such creations. As of now, Fusion360 will allow you to put tabs on curved surfaces, but you don't get to manually place them in that case. So its a bit of fun getting things where you want them by adjusting other parameters.

Also I have noticed some issues with tabs on curves where exact multiples of layer depth align perfectly with the top of the tab height. Making sure that case doesn't happen makes sure the resulting undesired cuts don't happen. So as usual I managed to learn a bunch of stuff while making something that wasn't in my normal comfort zone.

The four candles are run of a small buck converter and wired in parallel at 3 volts to simulate the batteries they normall run of.

I can feel a gnarled brass candle base coming at some stage to help mitigate the floating candle look. Adding some melted real wax has also been suggested to give a more real look.